Archive for the ‘Public Relations’ Category

Marketing Your Firm’s Charitable Work

There are so many positives that come from doing charitable work.  Because of this, I’m a strong advocate of having my law firm clients participate in at least one community service project each year.

Below are 4 ways charitable work can positively impact a law firm.  But please keep one overriding thought as you read them:

The reason to participate in charitable work is because it’s the right thing to do.  None of the below would be worthwhile if you weren’t helping others.

First, your charitable work matters to clients.  Large companies know this, which is why we often see charitable donations made during halftimes of highly watched sporting events.  Law firms also need differentiators to win the best clients.  It’s likely there are local firms with equally as impressive experience, education and fee structures as yours.  Charitable work gives you the opportunity to show that there are things that matter to your attorneys and staff outside of making money.  Furthermore, if a decision maker for a potential client is involved with a certain charity (e.g. American Cancer Society), and sees that you are too, your firm naturally has a much better chance of earning their business.

Second, it strengthens the relationships between a law firm’s lawyers and staff.  I’ve even seen two employees of a firm that didn’t get along repair a relationship after being teamed at a community service project.  Well-chosen events also bring employees’ spouses and children together for a really great cause.  It sends everyone home feeling good not only about the contribution they made, but also about the place they (or their spouse or parent) work.  This is an often underestimated benefit of charitable work, and goes a long way toward building a really great workplace… and earning the support of family members who tolerate the long hours and stress that are part of a successful law practice. Read More »

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You Got a Negative Online Review. Now What? (Part II)

(This is the second part of a two-part post regarding how to deal with negative online reviews about your law firm.  For Part I, click here.)

Ask the review site to remove the negative review.  Almost all review sites have community guidelines that prohibit hateful, threatening, or even unsubstantiated reviews.  If someone has posted a review that falls into one of these categories, it’s often possible to have that review taken down.

Well-written reviews that don’t use objectionable language are hard to get removed, but it never hurts to ask.  I’ve seen one of the most popular review sites remove a well-written negative review about an attorney along with all the positive reviews.  While it’s hard to understand why they would do that, it accomplished our goal… which was to eliminate the negative impact of the bad review on the practice.

Contact the client via phone if you can identify him or her, and try to work through the issue.  Also, even if you have to agree to disagree on the material issue, ask them to remove the review.   At that point, they have three options. They can leave it up as is, remove it, or perhaps add a supplemental post.  I’ve seen unhappy clients actually post a positive review about the lawyer contacting them later to work-out a problem.  This can go a long way with future potential clients, because it shows you care and are willing to go the extra mile to make a client happy.

(Note that I recommended contacting the person by phone, and not via written correspondence.  The reason?  Anything you write at this point may end up online, too.  Not only is it safer to have a verbal conversation about the issue, your tone may go a long way with the unhappy client, which is something that is often lost in emails and letters.) Read More »

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You Got a Negative Online Review. Now What? (Part I)

There is no shortage of advice on the internet about what to do when your business has received a bad online review.  Notwithstanding all the debate, there is one absolute truth when it comes to negative reviews.

If you are in business long enough, you will get one.

It could be a very legitimate complaint, a crazy client, or a competitor looking to damage your reputation. I’ve even seen a review from an understandably disgruntled client, but one that posted it for the wrong attorney!

Below is the first of a two-part post that will cover four options for dealing with negative online reviews:

Don’t respond.
Ask the review website to remove the negative info.
Contact the client via phone if you know who it is.
Bury the negative review in positive ones.

In most cases, don’t respond. This advice may come as a surprise to many. But the reality is that if a client is angry enough to go online, jump through a number of hoops, and write about their perceived poor experience, you are unlikely to change their mind. And responding can help fuel the fire, in more ways than one. Read More »

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